In February 1918, the Representation of the People Act was passed in the UK, giving some women the right to vote for the first time.

The London Assembly agreed a unanimous motion on 8 February celebrating the achievements of the women who fought passionately to make it happen.

Fiona Twycross AM, who proposed the motion said:

“It is absolutely vital that we mark 100 years since some women secured the right to vote in the UK and give our full support to the events and campaigns that are happening across London to celebrate this anniversary. We now need to do everything we can and further promote the cause of gender equality. This is why I am delighted to get behind the Mayor’s #BehindEveryGreatCity campaign that champions the contributions of women from all backgrounds to our city”.

The full text of the motion is:

This Assembly notes that 2018 marks 100 years since some women secured the right to vote for the first time in the UK. The Representation of the People Act was passed on 6 February 1918 giving women the vote provided they were aged over 30 and either they, or their husband, met a property qualification. This year is also the 90th anniversary of women gaining equal voting rights to men by the Equal Franchise Act.

The Assembly welcomes the various campaigns and events to celebrate this anniversary and to promote further gender equality; including the Mayor’s campaign #BehindEveryGreatCity that will champion the achievements and contributions of women, from all walks of life, to London.